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titleFinally I have finished my next film FREEDOM TO LEARN whoopeeeeee

Here is the trailer and link to watch the full film.

I will be organising screenings soon and will post updates here!

Freedom to Learn from kate jangra on Vimeo.

re-posted with permission:

Late last week, The Washington Post highlighted a bit of a rant titled “What the modern world has forgotten about children and learning,” by author Carol Black.

In essence, Black’s article takes issue with the modern education system’s insistence that every child fit into its timetable of learning. Nowhere is this seen more clearly than in the area of reading.

When people really want a skill, it goes viral. You couldn’t stop it if you tried.”

According to Black, Americans during the time of the Founding Fathers were regularly reading difficult material, and learned to do so from many sources, only one of which was the education system of the time. “They could read,” she notes, “because, in a literate population, it is really not that difficult to transmit literacy from one person to the next. When people really want a skill, it goes viral. You couldn’t stop it if you tried.”

Black goes on to note that this is the same motivation behind the way the current society has learned to operate computers: “We don’t know how to use computers because we learned it in school, but because we wanted to learn it and we were free to learn it in whatever way worked best for us.”

Yet despite seeing this natural learning take place with computer usage, we’re still reluctant to put it to practice in the realm of reading:

“In the modern world, unless you learn to read by age 4, you are no longer free to learn in this way. Now your learning process will be scientifically planned, controlled, monitored and measured by highly trained ‘experts’ operating according to the best available ‘data.’ If your learning style doesn’t fit this year’s theory, you will be humiliated, remediated, scrutinized, stigmatized, tested, and ultimately diagnosed and labelled as having a mild defect in your brain.”

Black’s comments remind me of a concept long promoted by Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Moore. As they explain in their book Better Late than Early, the Moores have “analyzed over 8000 studies of children’s senses, brain, cognition, socialization, etc., and are certain that no replicable evidence exists for rushing children into formal study at home or school before 8 to 10.

Such a suggestion is shocking, particularly in an age in which we’re trying to get students reading by the time they leave kindergarten. Won’t such a practice damage children and set them on a course of functional illiteracy for life?

Not necessarily. In fact, the Moores have found that giving children time and space to explore and learn to read on their own timetable may actually set them on a path to greater understanding and maturity:

“Read, sing and play with your children from birth. Read to them several times a day, and they will learn to read in their own time – as early as 3 or 4, but usually later, some as late as 14. Late readers are no more likely to be retarded or disabled than early ones. They often become the best readers of all – with undamaged vision and acute hearing, more adult-like reasoning (cognition) levels, mature brain structure[,] less blocking of creative interests.”

If what the Moore’s research says is true, then is it possible that the educational decline America is experiencing is partly due to the push to get students into formal education environments at earlier ages? Would we get better results if we relaxed compulsory education laws and let learning take a more natural course until children reach age 8 or so?

A version of this article was first published by Intellectual Takeout.

Annie Holmquist


Annie Holmquist

Annie is a research associate with Intellectual Takeout. In her role, she writes for the blog, conducts a variety of research for the organization’s websites and social media pages, and assists with development projects. She particularly loves digging into the historical aspects of America’s educational structure.

 

This article was originally published on FEE.org. Read the original article.

I am devastated. I will look up my interview with Camila and publish as she is totally devoted to these vulnerable children, and I am so sad for them and for our society. We will all suffer because of this. Every one of us has a responsibility to look after the innocent children. It is immoral to allow Kids Company to close, especially as we bailed out RSBC for so much more. I feel sick. will this lead to riots?

Shadowminds

I woke up this morning to the news that Kids Company, behemoth of the youth sector and the organisation to which I owe my initiation into this shadowy and (once) unfamiliar territory is about to shut its doors imminently. I originally set up this blog as a new Key Worker at KidsCo, eyes open wide with the intensity of the issues, stories and events I was experiencing. Hopeful and enlivened by the incredible people I met and their dedication to those they worked with, my initial intention was to showcase some of these dedicated, zealous mercenaries of youth work for whom I have so much respect. Unfortunately the pressures of the work, emotional energy needed to do it, and my increasing passion for establishing new projects while working there prevented me from making this project happen.

It is with a sad irony that this morning, on hearing that KidsCo is to shut its doors…

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I’m so pleased and proud to say that BABYHOOD has won an Award, after being part of Culture Unplugged Festival.

“To share with you in brief, a different guest panel of visionaries is invited for each festival to watch a small selection of films and identify the film that is most conscious in its selection of story, vision, and art of filmmaking—that awakens the global citizens and helps them usher life toward a new direction. ”

As well as making me literally jump for joy, it has propelled me into my next film with a deep sense of commitment.

This time I want to make a film that looks at childhood, in particular the process of being a child, and how the modern world is stealing so many elements of growing up from our children.

It has grown out of my questioning of the systems in place around schooling. As my 5yr old revels in the wonder of the world around him, I strive to keep that wonderment in place and have chosen not to send him to school.

Schools are testing children at younger and younger ages, and failing children at every level. Nature is being branded as a commodity, along with technology replicating real life experiences.

I want to question all of this and more.

Its complicated.

I will be uploading small clips here soon, let me know if this appeals to you, or if you have a story to tell.

peace and joy x

IMG_2476

what an incredible idea!

Laura Grace Weldon

fetal cells heal mother, life long benefits of pregnancy, baby's cells help mother, Fetal cells remain to heal a mother throughout her life. shortgreenpigg.deviantart.com

Today is my youngest child’s birthday. As my mother used to tell me, we always carry our children in our hearts. I know this is true emotionally. Apparently it’s also true on the physical level.

Sometimes science is filled with transcendent meaning more beautiful than any poem. To me, this new research shows the poetry packed in the people all around us.

It’s now known that cells from a developing fetus cross the placenta, allowing the baby’s DNA to become part of the mother’s body.  These fetal cells persist in a woman’s body into her old age. (If she has been pregnant with a male child it’s likely she’ll have some Y-chromosomes drifting around for a few decades too). This is true even if the baby she carried didn’t live to be born. The cells of that child stay…

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Again this is telling us the obvious. We must learn to nurture our babies, if it doesn’t come naturally to us….

another thoughtful post from Sarah Ockwell-Smith which i felt the need to reblog as i have been so rubbish at blogging anything original for sooooo long!! having 2 littlies under 5 (not for long) is soooo time consuming and deliciously wonderful – no time for thoughtful posts – sorry! x

Yet again I have found a response from Sarah that totally clarifies what I am parenting for. More empathy. More peace and more love.

love this review from Suzanne Zeedyk – Thanks!

Suzanne Zeedyk

The information about babies’ needs and babies’ experiences is flooding in these days.  It can seem daunting to try to get any overview on those messages.

For anyone interested in trying to do just that, you might have a look at the new film out by Kate Jangra, called Babyhood. Kate is an independent filmmaker and mother, who wanted to try to provide insights into what she sees as the landscape within which children are today growing up.

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