Archives for posts with tag: dr. sears

I’m so pleased and proud to say that BABYHOOD has won an Award, after being part of Culture Unplugged Festival.

“To share with you in brief, a different guest panel of visionaries is invited for each festival to watch a small selection of films and identify the film that is most conscious in its selection of story, vision, and art of filmmaking—that awakens the global citizens and helps them usher life toward a new direction. ”

As well as making me literally jump for joy, it has propelled me into my next film with a deep sense of commitment.

This time I want to make a film that looks at childhood, in particular the process of being a child, and how the modern world is stealing so many elements of growing up from our children.

It has grown out of my questioning of the systems in place around schooling. As my 5yr old revels in the wonder of the world around him, I strive to keep that wonderment in place and have chosen not to send him to school.

Schools are testing children at younger and younger ages, and failing children at every level. Nature is being branded as a commodity, along with technology replicating real life experiences.

I want to question all of this and more.

Its complicated.

I will be uploading small clips here soon, let me know if this appeals to you, or if you have a story to tell.

peace and joy x

WOW – a very brave woman on the cover of Time magazine defending extended breastfeeding, and why not as she herself was breastfed until she self-weaned, and has warm memories of it. Interesting, as the conversations that are now going on are about her and the cover, rather than the portrait of Dr. Sears whom they call the man who remade motherhood.

In my film i talked to Suzanne Zeedyk about attachment theory, not to be confused with attachment parenting – although it is somehow born of the theory. Basically it is the idea that the better the relationship the baby has with it’s caregiver (s) the more chance that their brain will develop in the best way possible, and their ability to have relationships with other people throughout their lives will be optimal. It makes sense really.

It seems inevitable that women are getting defensive about how they are bringing up their children, as guilt and blame still feature so highly in this discussion. But I hope we can move away from feeling guilty about weaning our babies when we do, and accepting the differences in every family, and instead start to look as a whole at our attitudes towards babies and children, as we need to accept that…

“we have to take immense responsibility for care, as you [we] are generating the fundamentals of another human being for the rest of their lives” Camila Batmanghelidjh