Archives for posts with tag: breastfeeding

I’m so pleased and proud to say that BABYHOOD has won an Award, after being part of Culture Unplugged Festival.

“To share with you in brief, a different guest panel of visionaries is invited for each festival to watch a small selection of films and identify the film that is most conscious in its selection of story, vision, and art of filmmaking—that awakens the global citizens and helps them usher life toward a new direction. ”

As well as making me literally jump for joy, it has propelled me into my next film with a deep sense of commitment.

This time I want to make a film that looks at childhood, in particular the process of being a child, and how the modern world is stealing so many elements of growing up from our children.

It has grown out of my questioning of the systems in place around schooling. As my 5yr old revels in the wonder of the world around him, I strive to keep that wonderment in place and have chosen not to send him to school.

Schools are testing children at younger and younger ages, and failing children at every level. Nature is being branded as a commodity, along with technology replicating real life experiences.

I want to question all of this and more.

Its complicated.

I will be uploading small clips here soon, let me know if this appeals to you, or if you have a story to tell.

peace and joy x


I have just made a new batch of DVD’s that are now ready to buy for £9.99 plus P&P. Get them while you can!
email me: katejangra [at] gmail [dot] com

This is a great poem from Hollie McNish about breastfeeding in public. I am so pleased she is getting some attention – it’s about time. Hollie rocks! I loved working with her to record the poems we used in the film, and we  shared so much in common. Go girl!

I just found this review of Babyhood on Sausage Mama.

How I wish I’d seen this documentary when I was first pregnant. How I wish I’d seen this when I was pregnant again, so I could be gently reminded what direction I wanted things to go in parenting wise with my toddler. How THANKFUL I am to see this now, when we seem to have gotten a little unbalanced with technology and ‘entertainment’ instead of ‘playing’ with my 4 year old and my almost 2 year old. As always, I’m reminded to simplify, simplify. Just as I’m getting ansy about not getting back into the workforce yet, because I would like some nice stuff for once, I’m thankful to be brought back down to Earth.

I am so pleased to find things like this out there! Thanks Sausage Mama!!

So it’s World Breastfeeding Week, and by chance I happened to take my LO’s to see the dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum and we then popped over to the V&A to paddle in their lovely courtyard. On our way into the V&A there was this statue that seemed (there was one at the top and one at the bottom) to show us the way we could go using the ramps – we had buggies and slings on!  Nicely timed I thought. Its made by a french artist called Jules Dalou in around 1873…long time ago. I wish i could breastfeed this confidently in public!!

Anyway Babyhood is also showing as part of the Breastfeeding Festival on the 11th August. If you are in the area! Hope to write a bit more soon, but don’t seem to get more than a minute to myself these days!

I couldn’t resist posting this, which i found when I was looking for breastfeeding images to help set up a friends blog today. He is yummy eh?!

WOW – a very brave woman on the cover of Time magazine defending extended breastfeeding, and why not as she herself was breastfed until she self-weaned, and has warm memories of it. Interesting, as the conversations that are now going on are about her and the cover, rather than the portrait of Dr. Sears whom they call the man who remade motherhood.

In my film i talked to Suzanne Zeedyk about attachment theory, not to be confused with attachment parenting – although it is somehow born of the theory. Basically it is the idea that the better the relationship the baby has with it’s caregiver (s) the more chance that their brain will develop in the best way possible, and their ability to have relationships with other people throughout their lives will be optimal. It makes sense really.

It seems inevitable that women are getting defensive about how they are bringing up their children, as guilt and blame still feature so highly in this discussion. But I hope we can move away from feeling guilty about weaning our babies when we do, and accepting the differences in every family, and instead start to look as a whole at our attitudes towards babies and children, as we need to accept that…

“we have to take immense responsibility for care, as you [we] are generating the fundamentals of another human being for the rest of their lives” Camila Batmanghelidjh